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Posts Tagged ‘savoring’

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I’m over-the-moon excited to have pictures from my home garden featured on Fine Gardening magazine’s website today.

As many gardeners know, growing is a year-round job (we’re planning and cleaning up, even in winter) and we don’t often get a chance to share. Often, we’re alone when we experience those magical moments….the sight of a hummingbird or dragonfly hovering near a flower bed; the first lush harvest of spring greens; the ripening rose of a tomato; the crinkled tips of kale, waving for your attention and just visible beneath the snow.

And sunflowers – don’t get me started. Next to daffodils, toddlers, and puppies, I think they’re some of the happiest things on earth. (more…)

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Over my past seventeen years as a psychotherapist, I’ve helped individuals navigate a myriad of physical and mental health struggles and delivered a variety of research-supported interventions. I’ve also maintained a long-standing passion for health education, both as a tool for recovery and a preventative measure.

In this next chapter that I’ve named The SAVOR Project, I’m bringing what I’ve learned as a psychologist to the (literal and figurative) table to promote a more positive, connected  relationship with food. And the journey begins with food literacy, which can be broadly defined as the ability to access, choose, process, and enjoy food.   (more…)

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This month, I’m officially entering phase one of The SAVOR Project! I’ve secured a plot at Ridgewood Park, a SW Portland community garden, and over the next few seasons, I’ll use this space as a demo garden to highlight the benefits of interacting with and cultivating an urban edible garden. It will also serve as the meeting place for a number of low-cost public offerings through The SAVOR Project’s “outdoor school” workshop series. Most of what I harvest from this plot will be given away to workshop participants and the Produce for People Program. (more…)

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shutterstock_1598655364Monday afternoon, we said goodbye to one of our beloved pets, a long-haired feline named Turtle. Turtle loved her dogs, my husband, water play, movietime, and Friday night’s roast chicken. She joined our family fourteen years ago, her arrival wedged in between the last few days before my grandfather’s death, and the weekend I walked to receive my doctoral degree.

We’ve lived a great deal, since then. Our daughter has known Turtle her whole life.

The vulnerability researcher Brene Brown once said something to the effect of, our ability to experience joy is directly proportional to our willingness to be broken-hearted.

Oh my goodness, it hurts to say goodbye.  (more…)

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From Embracing the Good, a chapter in the Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook (Neff & Germer, 2018):

“Savoring involves noticing and appreciating the positive aspects of life – taking them in, letting them linger, and then letting them go. It is more than pleasure – savoring involves mindful awareness of the experience of pleasure…” (p.161)

Let’s be honest. How often do we miss opportunities to savor because our minds are nowhere to be found? To be distracted, to wake up breathing this morning (hooray!) and yet to find ourselves pulled in a hundred directions before our feet hit the floor – welcome to the experience of being human. So it’s for good reason that we call this the practice of mindfulness, the practice of mindful eating, the practice of savoring. Guess what? We get our whole lives to strengthen these skills.  (more…)

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20191201_124752It’s a relief to catch my breath after the frenetic pace of summer. Winter is a time of rest, both for the soil and for our bodies. Shorter days, cooler weather – an opportunity to slow down, go to bed earlier, take stock of the previous months and contemplate what lies ahead. Recently, however, I wandered outside to visit my neglected vegetable beds and reacquaint myself with my edible garden.

Around the yard, the bare limbs of our apple, pear, and hazelnut trees were outlined against a heavy gray sky. Much of the garden appeared dormant and yet life pulsed just below the surface. A few beds offered their remaining bounty – herbs, a lone rutabaga and kohlrabi hiding beneath an overgrown forest of aragula, a last row of leeks, a small patch of beets.

As usual, I’ve impressed with the hardiness of greens like kale and swiss chard, and how they often persevere through frost and snow.  Aren’t we all like this – surprising in our resilience? (more…)

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