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Posts Tagged ‘nature’

In the picture below, a couple of our hens are enjoying one of their first spring days outside. April 2016. They’re little more than scrappy balls of molting feathers, but over the┬ácourse of four months, they will blossom into full-fledged hens.

During their first winter – despite the fierce weather20160913_114400 (1), which hit us especially hard up here in the hills outside Portland – our girls kept on laying. And laying. And laying. Every afternoon after work, I’d trudge through the snow or rain or sleet to collect a handful of brown, still-warm eggs, often nested beneath a cooing, broody hen.

Frittatas. Egg scrambles. Sunday apple baked pancakes, and other baked goods. Soon we were giving eggs for birthday presents, as thank you’s and house-warming gifts. You get the picture. Our refrigerator filled up with eggs and meanwhile, I started fantasizing about getting more chicks. It was official – I was turning into the Chicken Lady. (more…)

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wendell-berry-the-peace-of-wild-things

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When you are lost

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This picture is from the grounds of Cloud Mountain, a meditation retreat center in rural Washington (1 hour from Portland), where I’ve been grateful to sit at in the past. It seemed fitting for a poem I also return to, again and again.

Lost

Stand still. The trees ahead and the bushes beside you

are not lost. Wherever you are is called Here,

and you must treat it as a powerful stranger,

must ask permission to know it and be known.

The forest breathes. Listen. It answers,

I have made this place around you,

If you leave it you may come back again, saying Here.

 

No two trees are the same to Raven.

No two branches are the same to Wren.

If what a tree or a bush does is lost on you,

You are surely lost. Stand still. The forest knows

where you are. You must let it find you.

 

An old Native American elder story rendered into modern English by David Wagoner, in the Heart Aroused: Poetry and the Preservation of the Soul in Corporate America, by David Whyte.

 

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